Types of Writs in the Indian constitution | Various types of writs in the Indian constitution

Types of Writs in the Indian constitution | Various types of writs in the Indian constitution

The Constitution of India is the supreme law of the country, which outlines the framework of the Indian government and its various institutions. It was adopted by the Constituent Assembly on November 26, 1949, and came into effect on January 26, 1950. The Indian Constitution is a written document that comprises a Preamble, 448 articles, and 12 schedules.

Five types of writs are mentioned in the Indian Constitution under Article 32 and Article 226. They are:

Habeas Corpus: The writ of Habeas Corpus is a Latin term that means “you should have the body”. It is a writ that is issued by a court to a person who is being detained or imprisoned illegally. The purpose of this writ is to ensure that the person who is being detained is produced before the court so that the court can examine the legality of the detention.
Mandamus: The writ of Mandamus is a Latin term that means “we command”. It is a writ that is issued by a court to a public official or a public authority to perform their duty. The purpose of this writ is to ensure that public officials or public authorities perform their duties according to the law.

Prohibition: The writ of Prohibition is a writ that is issued by a higher court to a lower court or a quasi-judicial authority to prevent them from exceeding their jurisdiction or acting more than their legal authority. The purpose of this writ is to ensure that the lower court or quasi-judicial authority does not act beyond its jurisdiction.

Certiorari:
The writ of Certiorari is a Latin term that means “to be certified”. It is a writ that is issued by a higher court to a lower court or a quasi-judicial authority to quash their order. The purpose of this writ is to ensure that the order of the lower court or quasi-judicial authority is in accordance with the law.

Quo Warranto:
The writ of Quo Warranto is a Latin term that means “by what authority”. It is a writ that is issued by a court to a public official or a public authority to show their authority for holding a particular office or position. The purpose of this writ is to ensure that the public officials or public authorities are holding their office or position legally and within their authority.

In conclusion, these five types of writs are essential tools in the hands of the judiciary to protect the fundamental rights of the citizens of India and ensure that the government and its authorities work within the framework of the law.

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